Boxley Valley in the fall

Boxley Valley in the fall

This weekend my family and I took a quick trip to Boxley Valley to check out the local elk population and the fall colors. We loaded up at 5 am to make the 2 hour drive to Ponca. We wanted to arrive just before sunrise to have the best possible chance at spotting one of the herds that gather in Boxley Vally for the rut. The elk viewing was very thin, there were no herds visible Sunday morning with just a few stragglers mulling about the valley. None of the herds were out in the open. We did hear some distant bugling from the elk, so they were not to far off… So, we made the drive through the valley enjoying the fall color. The peak is just a few days away with most of the trees showing some color.  ...
Choosing the right focal length

Choosing the right focal length

  Seems like an easy thing to do, just point the camera at your subject, frame your subject and if it fits; shoot. If not, zoom out or zoom in. But, there is so much more to it than that. Different focal lengths provide different looks. Wide lenses will exaggerate distances, while longer lenses will compress distances and objects. The relationship of distance between objects will be compressed with longer lenses, and exaggerated with wide lenses. Now, most people will agree that longer lenses are great portrait lenses. They compress distances, framing the face in a very flattering way. Most, would also agree that wide lenses (especially very wide lenses) are not the most flattering for portraits. They tend to exaggerate the distances from the tip of the nose to the ears, etc, etc. They also tend to make people look   *ahem*….wider. Which if you are being paid to do a portrait, probably not the way to go. Now, most will also agree that the best (and most common) choice for a lens when shooting landscapes and such would be a wide lens. Now, don’t get me wrong, I love my 14mm wide lens, but it is not always the lens I grab when shooting landscapes. Many compositions can benefit from the compression that a longer lens will give to a scene. Most photographers think of lenses only in the ability to change the field of view, but there is much more to the look of a than just field of view. Early spring we went on a short hike on the Rails to Trails Conservatory trail near the...
High water in Pigeon Creek – Arkansas

High water in Pigeon Creek – Arkansas

So, I was out driving around yesterday, and I noticed that the water levels at Pigeon Creek were much higher than I have ever seen them before. I have photographed this area before, you can see the images here. When I saw how much it has changed with all the rain we have had, I knew that I’d have to come back and make some images.   I wanted to get the smoothest looking water that i could, so I set up on tripod and used a 10 stop neutral density filter....
Camping in Haw Creek Arkansas

Camping in Haw Creek Arkansas

Camping is an activity that has been a part of my life since i was very young and in boy scouts. In the past, I would go camping 6 to 12 times a year. I often now go camping to reach places that I would not be able to photograph without an overnight trip. We have recently moved to Arkansas, and even though we have lived here for more than a year, we have not have had an opportunity to get out for a weekend.   I finally had a weekend that would work, but the time would be tight, because of things going on, we would not be able to leave for our trip until 2pm on Saturday. That is a little late to go camping, it did not leave time to hike in to any spots, so we were tailgate camping.  We have had an incredible amount of rain this summer. I was looking for a campground in the Buffalo River area, and I wanted a waterfall nearby. I found that Haw Creek Campground in St. Francis National Park met all of those wants. Even though we have had a ton of rain, the water levels in Haw Creek were low....
Arkansas Countryside during spring

Arkansas Countryside during spring

I have been swamped here lately. To many shoots and personal projects going on. I wanted to get out an shoot some of the spring flowers, but it seems that they have for the most part already finished blooming for the season. Wow, that was quick. I have driven past this spot several times and thought that there was a great image of the country side in there somewhere… I am not sure that I captured exactly what i was thinking, but I figured I would share it anyway....
Color or black and white?

Color or black and white?

Usually, when I go out out shoot, I have a plan. I usually have at least a rough idea of what I want to shoot. I scout areas ahead of time, and return when the light is right, and when other conditions are right. I am always looking for other opportunities as well, and plans can change and grow as I shoot. Here is one of those times. We live near the Norfork Dam, and I spent a fair amount of time there fishing and such. It is a really neat looking dam, but I have never seen any really nice images of it. Turns out, it is fairly difficult to make an interesting image of. I thought I would get there on a heavy overcast day, use a 10 stop neutral density filter and let the water blur, with the moodiness of the over cast day in black-and-white. Can you see it? I could. [nggallery id=6] But, when i got there, the clouds broke and this awesome color bloomed on the clouds. I still used the 10 stop filter and I added a circular polarizer to remove the refections. It was a 30 second exposure at f4 is0200. So, what do you think? High contrast black and white or color? I think i still like the black and white better. Happy...