Mother Bear and Cub Sleeping in the Great Smoky Mountain National Park.

Mother Bear and Cub Sleeping in the Great Smoky Mountain National Park.

I stumbled across a family of bears sleeping the heat of the day away while photographing the Cade’s Cove area of the Great Smoky Mountian National Park. There were at least 3 young cubs in this tree, only 2 of them are clearly visible in the image because the tree is in the way. It can be so ridiculously difficult to find a bear or group of bears that you can get some nice sharp images of with out getting too close. The Park Service has strict rules and regulations about viewing and interacting with the wildlife in the Park. It is very important for the safety of the animals AND the visitors of the park.                ...
Photographing Black Bears in Smokies

Photographing Black Bears in Smokies

The Great Smoky Mountains is a very special place. I took the opportunity to spend a week camping in the Great Smoky Mountain National Park. My main goal during this trip was to see some bears and hopefully get close enough to photograph them (without getting too close, of course). The early summer is a very active time for the black bear population in the Smokies. The female bears (called sows) are busy grazing and protecting their cubs, while the male bears (called boars) are running around the park looking for cubs to kill. If the male bear can kill a litter of cubs the female will go back into heat this early in the season. The berries are also starting to ripen and be ready to eat. There is a ton of bear activity in the park in June!  ...
Shooting Film – The Analog Camera

Shooting Film – The Analog Camera

I started my journey in photography in High School. I took a darkroom class my junior year, and instantly clicked. I spent my junior and senior year in the darkroom, managed to build my own darkroom that I set up in the bathroom – much to my wife’s dismay. I still shoot and process film, but have sold the darkroom equipment. I instead have a good scanner and use that to make prints. I still  regularly shoot film, and have a significant backlog to develop – somewhere around 100-125 rolls of film in the freezer. I shoot more than I have time to process. To keep things interesting, when I am done shooting a roll of film, i throw it in the freezer with all of the other exposed film. There is no organization. When I go to develop, I have absolutely no idea what will be on the roll. It is a complete surprise to me. In the late 90’s, I was shooting film. There really was no such thing as “digital” photography (as we know it today, anyway). I was shooting a Pentax k1000 and a Minolta Maxxum 7. At the time, I was still developing a sense of style and still learning how to shoot. I was working as a photographer here and there, doing portrait work for my day job and moonlighting any chance I could get. At this point, I desperately wanted a Hasselblad 501c. I thought that all of the difficulties that I was having, the reason that many of the images were not working out was because my camera was not good...
Waterfall below Mirror Lake, Blanchard Springs Arkansas

Waterfall below Mirror Lake, Blanchard Springs Arkansas

I took a trip to Blanchard Springs this week. I have heard about the waterfalls below Mirror Lake, and have been looking for an opportunity to go see them for sometime. I was surprised to discover the ruins of an old mill near the waterfall. Mirror Lake is actually a man made lake. with a small dam that creates the waterfall. The Civilian Conservation Corps built the stone and concrete dam that created the lake during the 1930s. The water was pretty high on my first trip out, and I am looking forward to going back.          ...
Floodgates open on Norfork Dam

Floodgates open on Norfork Dam

I have lived here for close to 3 years now, and have never had the opportunity to see the floodgates open on any of the local dams. We have had quite a bit of rain, and today the floodgates were opened. Around 4pm they opened the floodgates, and i heard about it through facebook. It was 9pm, and after a tense 30 min drive ( i am not sure how long the floodgates will remain open) we arrived. The roar of the water was loud enough that we could hear it as soon as we drove into Quarry Park. It was so dark by 9pm, that we could barely see it.          ...
Photographing Thunderstorms

Photographing Thunderstorms

  Warmer weather brings all the things that photographers typically love. The flowers are starting to come up and trees are quickly turning green. In this area of the country, it also brings the threat of severe weather. Photographing weather can be a challenging and fun pursuit, but I can also be very dangerous. Before discussing how to photograph storms, we need to spend a little time discussing safety. It is not really possible to take night shots of storms and lightning with out a tripod, and it should go without saying that standing next to a metal lightning rod (in this case: your tripod) and photographing a storm moving through the area is not a very good idea. Then, you still have to deal with strong winds, hail, tornados, and possibly flash flooding. This is one of those activities that you really should not try at home. Here are some stats about the dangers of being out in severe weather: http://www.nws.noaa.gov/os/hazstats/sum13.pdf Lighting safety here: http://www.lightningsafety.noaa.gov/    Basically, if you can hear thunder you are in danger of being struck by lightning. But, I suppose, if you are like me… you cannot resist the temptation to try to get a few shots of a landscape with some lightning in it. Finding a location. Every storm is a little different, but the formula is fairly similar. I usually have best results after dark. I will watch the weather reports to see where the storm is and which way it is moving in from. Almost always the storms move from west to east here. So I am usually looking for some point...