Current Project – The Analogue Camera

I started my journey in photography in High School. I took a darkroom class my junior year and instantly clicked. I spent my junior and senior year in the darkroom, managed to build my own darkroom that I set up in the bathroom – much to my wife’s dismay. I still shoot and process film, but have sold the darkroom equipment. I instead have a good scanner and use that to make prints. I still regularly shoot film and have a significant backlog to develop – somewhere around 100-125 rolls of film in the freezer. I shoot more than I have time to process. To keep things interesting, when I am done shooting a roll of film, I throw it in the freezer with all of the other exposed films. There is no organization. When I go to develop, I have absolutely no idea what will be on the roll. It is a complete surprise to me.

In the late 90’s, I was shooting film. There really was no such thing as “digital” photography (as we know it today, anyway). I was shooting a Pentax k1000 and a Minolta Maxxum 7. At the time, I was still developing a sense of style and still learning how to shoot. I was working as a photographer here and there, doing portrait work for my day job and moonlighting any chance I could get. At this point, I desperately wanted a Hasselblad 501c. I thought that all of the difficulties that I was having, the reason that many of the images were not working out was that my camera was not good enough. At that time a full Hasselblad kit would set me back at least $4000… which was way more than would ever be possible for me to justify.

I learned of the Kiev 88 which was a Soviet clone of the Hasselblad 1600. The Kiev 88 was a low cost, entry-level medium format camera, and sometime in 2000, I ended up buying one with a couple of lenses and backs. It may have been one of the worst decisions I have ever made in my photography career. I purchased it on eBay from a seller in Russia and after much worrying, the camera arrived to me in a burlap sack with wax seals. The camera seemed to be solid, all the functions seemed to work, but I soon discovered that there were problems with the film back.  I ended up shooting with this camera for a few years and then traded it to get a more reliable camera.

Anyway, the whole point of this story is that I started working on developing roll film again, and one of the first rolls I developed last week were from that camera. I was a bit of a surprise to me, to see a roll of film that i shot more than 15 years ago.

Tree growing in front of the Dam

I was out driving around not too long ago, and I noticed this tree in front of the dam on Norfork Lake. I kinda liked the way all the lines […]

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Mysterious Ruins on Norfork Lake

Near one of the access points on Norfork Lake, I found the ruins of an old house. I have searched around for some information about the history of this structure, […]

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Bleached Cypress Tree

Recently I sold my 4×5 studio camera and purchased a 4×5 field camera. I ended up settling with a Penta 45f which is a copy of the Wista 45 field […]

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Gulf State Park – Fishing Pier

This was my first trip to the fishing pier in Gulf State Park, near Mobile, Alabama. I arrived about an hour before sunrise, the first hint of daylight just starting […]

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Moss covered waterfall at Roaring Fork

This was my first ever trip to Roaring Fork in Gatlinburg. The Great Smoky Mountain National Park is my happy place, but until recently, I had never visited this little […]

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4×5 film vs. Canon 7d

A short time ago I sold my old 4×5 studio rail camera and acquired a newer, smaller 4×5 folding camera. I ended up settling with a Penta 45f (which is a […]

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Shooting Film – The Analog Camera

I started my journey in photography in High School. I took a darkroom class my junior year, and instantly clicked. I spent my junior and senior year in the darkroom, […]

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The Analog Camera

    Digital capture has completely changed photography. The digital won, it is cheaper, quicker, and easier to work with, more accessible to everyone. There are almost no downsides when […]

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Film is not dead.

This is not a debate in the Digital vs. Film argument.  For the most part, Digital Technology has effectively killed traditional film work in the consumer market and in the […]

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