Highway 62 Bridge over Lake Norfork

Highway 62 Bridge over Lake Norfork

Looking back on my posts for the last few weeks, there is one very common thread – it is cold here. And, That won’t change with this post. I was out riding around the other day and stopped to make an image of Lake Norfork and the HWY 62 Bridge. This image was made with a Canon 6d + 17-40L set at 17mm. I used a B&W ND110 filter to get a 75 second exposure at f16. Processed in Lightroom 5...
Winter in the Ozark Mountains

Winter in the Ozark Mountains

Old man winter continues to pound us here in Northern Arkansas. We have accumulated a few more inches of snow over the last week,and there is more forecasted early next week. I am not sure when we will have the opportunity to fully dig out, but the roads were clearer today and we decided to see what we could see. This image is a HDR image made from 7 frames evenly exposed 1 EV apart. My EV 0 exposure was 1/60th of a second at f13. Canon 6d – 70mm lens....
Boxley Valley in the fall

Boxley Valley in the fall

This weekend my family and I took a quick trip to Boxley Valley to check out the local elk population and the fall colors. We loaded up at 5 am to make the 2 hour drive to Ponca. We wanted to arrive just before sunrise to have the best possible chance at spotting one of the herds that gather in Boxley Vally for the rut. The elk viewing was very thin, there were no herds visible Sunday morning with just a few stragglers mulling about the valley. None of the herds were out in the open. We did hear some distant bugling from the elk, so they were not to far off… So, we made the drive through the valley enjoying the fall color. The peak is just a few days away with most of the trees showing some color.  ...
Milky Way over the White River, Mountain Home Arkansas

Milky Way over the White River, Mountain Home Arkansas

My parents visited over the last weekend, and they stayed at a trout resort just outside of town. The resort they stayed at was located right on the river. The front porch has a river view with the boat dock just a few steps away. They had a fire pit and we came over to sit in front of the fire on their last night here. The night was clear and cold, and we had an awesome view of the southern sky, so naturally I took a few shots of the night sky. I saw several shooting stars, the Milky Way was easily visible in the southern sky last night. I used a Canon 6d + Rokinon 14/2.8 for this shot. I had the camera mounted on a very stable tripod. It was, of course, very dark when I shot this image, so when i set it up the first thing I did was take a few images to get the framing that i wanted. It is hard to tell what you are looking at when you can’t see a single thing through the viewfinder, it took me 2-3 images to get the framing that I wanted. For the framing shots I was using the highest iso my camera has (to get the shortest possible shutterspeed) because I did not want to wait 45 seconds between each shot while i was just framing the shot. After getting the framing right, I changed the iso to a much more manageable setting. In this case I was shooting at 8000 iso on a 6d, which provided a reasonable exposure time and...
Choosing the right focal length

Choosing the right focal length

  Seems like an easy thing to do, just point the camera at your subject, frame your subject and if it fits; shoot. If not, zoom out or zoom in. But, there is so much more to it than that. Different focal lengths provide different looks. Wide lenses will exaggerate distances, while longer lenses will compress distances and objects. The relationship of distance between objects will be compressed with longer lenses, and exaggerated with wide lenses. Now, most people will agree that longer lenses are great portrait lenses. They compress distances, framing the face in a very flattering way. Most, would also agree that wide lenses (especially very wide lenses) are not the most flattering for portraits. They tend to exaggerate the distances from the tip of the nose to the ears, etc, etc. They also tend to make people look   *ahem*….wider. Which if you are being paid to do a portrait, probably not the way to go. Now, most will also agree that the best (and most common) choice for a lens when shooting landscapes and such would be a wide lens. Now, don’t get me wrong, I love my 14mm wide lens, but it is not always the lens I grab when shooting landscapes. Many compositions can benefit from the compression that a longer lens will give to a scene. Most photographers think of lenses only in the ability to change the field of view, but there is much more to the look of a than just field of view. Early spring we went on a short hike on the Rails to Trails Conservatory trail near the...